The Godfather [Movie Review]

GodfatherI made him an offer he couldn’t refuse.

Overview: This 3-hour juggernaut of a film is one of those movies that can be difficult to get into, since it starts kind of slow, but once it captures you, you never want it to end. This film is one of Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpieces, based on the work of Mario Puzo. The story is about the Corleone family, which is both an actual blood-related family (who came over the big pond from Sicily) and a more loosely-knit “family” that just spills blood. Unless you’ve been living under a crate for the past 10 years, you’re probably at least somewhat familiar with the idea of crime syndicates (“the mob”, “the family”, “la cosa nostra” whatever). I don’t think it would be any stretch of the imagination to say that this film is the gold-standard for all mob-movies — nearly all derivatives since then at least give it a nod in some way or another.

Noteworthy Actors/Actresses: Marlon Brando (as Don Vito Corleone), Al Pacino, in one of his first roles (as Michael Corleone), Robert Duvall (as Tom Hagen, the not-so-Italian German/Irish Attorney and Consigliere), James Caan (as Santino “Sonny” Corleone) and Diane Keaton (as Kay Adams, Michael’s wife).

Verdict: The coveted #1 spot in the IMDB top 250 is reserved for a movie that is enduring, captivating and highest quality. While I can’t say with certainty that this is *THE MOVIE* to be #1, I can definitely say that it’s a deserving contender. This movie was well composed, the acting was excellent (how many movies do the actors convincingly actually speak the language instead of just attempting a weird accent?), and the plot was engaging, but not overpowering. The three-hour timespan definitely makes it kind of hard to just watch it on a whim, but I would consider it to be worth it!

From IMDB: (1972) The story begins as “Don” Vito Corleone, the head of a New York Mafia “family”, oversees his daughter’s wedding. His beloved son Michael has just come home from the war, but does not intend to become part of his father’s business. Through Michael’s life the nature of the family business becomes clear. The business of the family is just like the head of the family, kind and benevolent to those who give respect, but given to ruthless violence whenever anything stands against the good of the family. Don Vito lives his life in the way of the old country, but times are changing and some don’t want to follow the old ways and look out for community and “family”. An up and coming rival of the Corleone family wants to start selling drugs in New York, and needs the Don’s influence to further his plan. The clash of the Don’s fading old world values and the new ways will demand a terrible price, especially from Michael, all for the sake of the family.